Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 05/26/2011
"Americans would be alarmed if they knew how this law is being carried out."
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 05/26/2011
 (I know that Americans believe that we ought to only use) "Patriot Act powers to investigate terrorist or espionage-related targets. Yet, section 215 of the patriot act, the so-called business records provision, currently allows records to be collected on law-abiding Americans without any connections to terrorism or espionage. If we cannot limit investigations to terrorism or other nefarious activities, where do they end?"
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 12/28/2012
"The National Security Agency leadership states in a public forum that the agency does not keep dossiers on millions of Americans, and yet they will not give the Congress a yes or no answer as to whether the agency collects any sort of data on millions of Americans."
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
KNTV 06/17/2013
"I don't think collecting millions and millions of Americans' phone calls -- now, this is the meta data, this is time, place, to whom you direct the calls -- is making us any safer, and I think it's ultimately, perhaps, a violation of the 4th Amendment. I think we ought to have this debate. I’m going to introduce a bill this week that would narrow the reach of 215 to those who have a link to terrorism."
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 06/17/2013
"I think we owe it to the American people to have a fulsome debate in the open about the extent of these programs. You have a law that's been interpreted secretly by a secret court that then issues secret orders to generate a secret program. I just don't think this is an American approach to a world in which -- we have great threats, and my number one goal is to protect the American people, but we can do it in a way that also respects our civil liberties. I have no doubt."
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/30/2013
Americans in recent weeks are coming to understand what it means when Section 215 of the Patriot Act says that the government can obtain -- quote -- "any tangible thing relevant to a national security investigation." that is the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court's way of saying that Section 215 permits the collection of millions of Americans’' phone records on a daily ongoing basis.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/30/2013
I have seen no evidence that the bulk phone records collection program alone has played a meaningful role, if any role in disrupting terrorist plots. I have yet to see any convincing reason why agencies investigating terrorism cannot simply obtain information directly from phone companies using a regular court order. It may be more convenient
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/30/2013
If the government can use these powers to collect information on people who have no connection to terrorism, then where does it end? Is there no amount of information that our government can collect that would be off-limits? What's next? Our medical records? We must be able to put in place reasonable measures that allow our law enforcement agencies to pursue enemies who would try to harm us while protecting our rights as Americans.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/30/2013
I'm calling on the White House to begin to make the administrative changes to end the bulk collection of Americans’ phone records and conduct the program instead through direct queries to phone companies where there is a connection to terrorism or espionage. Under this more targeted approach, our government would retain its broad authorities to investigate terrorism while ordinary Americans would be protected from overly intrusive surveillance activities.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/30/2013
We need to strike a better balance between protecting our country against the threat of terrorism and defending our Constitutional rights. The bulk records collection program, as we know it today, does not meet this balanced test and that's why I believe it must end.
Steven Scully
Senior Executive Producer and Host C-SPAN
CSPAN 08/18/2013
The two democratic Senators Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, both members of the intelligence committee said in a joint statement there are more details to come, "the Executive Branch has now confirmed the rules and regulations and court imposed standards for protecting the privacy of Americans have been violated thousands of times each year" calling that "just the tip of the iceberg." (Niels Lesniewski, Roll Call, posted 4:14 pm August 16, 2013)
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
When I started serving on this committee two years ago, I determined early on that our surveillance laws needed reform. Since then, I have been proud to lead the fight, along with Senator Wyden and others. And now that more details of the NSA’s surveillance programs and their legal justifications have emerged, we are seeing a growing consensus, you see it here on this committee, that the status quo is unacceptable and that reforms are needed.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
Udall: Is it the goal of the NSA to collect the phone records of all Americans? You talk about building a haystack and that you want the haystack to be the ultimate size. Alexander: I believe it is in the nation’s best interest to put all the phone records in a locked box. That we could search when the nation needs to do it. Yes. The way we do it, the way we comply would ensure better security for this nation.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
Udall: In the spirit of transparency General, would you agree to declassify the whole history of the bulk collection program? Clapper: Not having read it, i would like to take it off the record. As a general premise, i think we are pushing transparency, and we will declassify as much as we can. I would rather read these documents and get some advice from general counsel about it. Udahl: My time is running out. I have many many more questions
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Udall: Let me move to the Snowden disclosures and what I think has been a clearly out lined as trust deficit that exists between the public and the intelligence community. This committee was created to address the severe breach of trust that developed when it was revealed the CIA was conducting unlawful domestic searches. The Church Committee went to work and found that to be true.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 06/05/2014
Udall: I agree that we must depend on the law to constrain potential future abuses of government surveillance, but I believe the House passed bill, the topic of our hearing today, falls short of this goal and is not the true reform I demanded and many other Americans have for years. In addition to my concerns that the House passed bill omits many of the surveillance reforms included in the original U.S.A. Freedom Act, the section 215 language in the House passed bill describing the specific selection term used to secretly collect records is vague enough to still allow the collection of mass information. I believe it is not this Administration's intent to interpret the language so broadly, by the NSA has shown time and time again it will seize on any wiggle room in the law and there's plenty of that in this bill.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 06/05/2014
Udall: So Mr. Cole, let me ask you, even if it is not the intent of this administration or even of this Congress, what would stop the FISA court from interpreting the specific selection term very broadly should the government asked it to do so? Cole: I think a lot of what would prohibit that is the legislative history, the statements of intent, the legislative history that we’re creating here today by making clear and unambiguous statements that isn't intended to stop bulk collection and that what we are focusing on is some focused, tailored inquiries that will depend on the facts and circumstances and it's impossible to predict all of them ahead of time. But to make sure that we do have focused inquiries and focused collection of information for our investigations.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 06/05/2014
Cole: I think in addition if there were an interpretation by the FISA court that it is very broad, that would be a novel and significant order and opinion and would be given to the United States Congress, given to the Senate, and the Senate would then have an opportunity to pass additional legislation to rein it back in. But I would be very, very surprised to see it go in that direction based on the language that's here and the legislative history. Udall: We do have a moment in time where we have to get this right, and with all due respect I don't remember the FISA court showing a great deal of restraint in the past.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Wagner: Senator Udall issued a statement that says ”I have lost confidence in John Brennan. I am concerned about the director's apparent inability to find any flaws in the agency he leads.” The White House is defending John Brennan, but one would imagine that the Senators on this intelligence committee are not going to let it simply end here with an apology from John Brennan. Landay: Well, I suspect not. Because you've already had several senators including Senator Wyden demanding to know, having a clear accountability of what happened, who, perhaps, ordered this intrusion. How it happened. I think there will probably be some internal wrangling over this, because look, the White House has said, John Brennan has said, and a lot of people on Capitol Hill have said they want to get this report out and put this entire matter behind them.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Kornacki: Colorado Senator Mark Udall, another democrat on the intelligence committee, vowed today to hold president Obama to his promise to declassify the report. Quote, “The CIA should not face its past with a redaction pen, and the white house must not allow it to do so.” The White House, for its part, defended the redactions this week, from that democratic criticism. Josh Earnest: There was a good faith effort that was made by the administration and by national security officials to evaluate this information and make redactions that are consistent with the need to protect national security, but also consistent with the president's clearly stated desire to be as transparent as possible about this. Kornacki: The President has said that we tortured some folks. He's also said that part of our national reckoning with that history is to make that history as transparent as possible in the hopes that putting it out on the public record will help ensure that it never happens again.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Udall: Steve, thanks for covering this story. Let me start with that. And also, let me just say, those of us on the intelligence committee want to have the strongest intelligence functions possible. we want to secure the American people. But we want to do it under the constitution, and under our laws. And that's why this report is so important to be released, so the American people can draw their own conclusions.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Udall: With all due respect to Director Clapper, 85% doesn't get the job do done. You can imagine reading a novel or a non-fiction piece for that matter, and if all the nouns, the what, where, when descriptions are taken out of that novel and all you have left are verbs and articles and punctuation, you're not going to be able to follow what's happening. That's really what the white house and the intelligence committee is proposing with these redactions. We're going to stand our ground on the intelligence committee. There has to be more details released. We don't have to go this far with this kind of redaction. And in the end, the point is to learn from what we did. We detained people, we tortured people. It's a stain on our history, but we're at our best as Americans when we learn from those mistakes and vow never to make them again.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Kornacki: Senator, in your opinion, is the CIA, and the administration, for that matter, trying to protect itself, trying to protect the CIA with these redactions? Is that the motive here? Udall: I can only conclude that to be the case, Steve. I was taken aback by the President's comments the other day, but there's clearly an effort on the part of past and present CIA leadership to make it more difficult to understand what happened. We know what happened. We can be a bigger and better country once we acknowledge what happened. And it's in times of challenge and difficulty where we need to stand most by our values and by our constitution. My friend, Senator McCain, made that point this week. And that's why I'm not going to relent. I know Senator Feinstein is firm in her belief that there needs to be as much declassified as possible. We're America. We can embrace what happened and be the better for it.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Kornacki: Does president Obama want this report to come out? He's committed to it. You said you want to hold him to it. Do you think he really want this report to come out? Udall: I do. As you know, I called for Director Brennan to step down recently. And I don't relish making that call, but I think we need a leadership change at the CIA. The Director spied, under his leadership, the CIA spied on committee. Then he denied that they had done So. and then he called into account or into question our voracity on the committee. And to me, it just signals that there is a movement to prevent this report from being released in the fullest way possible. I trust us as a country to learn from what we did, and to be better for it. And for the life of me, I can't understand why it would say it wouldn't work with us. And frankly, respect, separation of powers, and our oversight role on the intelligence committee.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Kornacki: and quickly, Senator, are you confident this will ultimately come out in a way that is meaningful? And when do you think that will happen? Udall: Yeah, I am confident. I can't give you a date certain, but I want to underline, that Senator Feinstein is resolute, I'm resolute, Chairman Levin is resolute. Many members of the Democratic caucus are resolute. We all understand the stakes if we were to let this report be redacted to the point that it's meaningless.
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